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The New Testament Greek
A thorough treatment of the essentials of the morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of the koine Greek language of the New Testament, with the reading of selected portions from the Gospels and Epistles of the Greek New Testament as time permits.
The New Testament Greek Readings
An assigned series of texts from the Greek New Testament and the Septuagint. This course is intended to refresh and enforce skills in the Greek of the Septuagint and New Testament periods. In addition, it is designed to give experience in reading large portions of the biblical Greek text. Texts are chosen from various genres. Special place is given to New Testament pericopes from the church lectionary. Prerequisite: New Testament Greek.
Hebrew I
The essentials of the morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. Hebrew I covers basic vocabulary and syntax, and the morphology of the regular verb. Hebrew II deals chiefly with the irregular verb formations and builds upon the lexical and syntactical foundation laid in Hebrew I.
Hebrew II
The essentials of the morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. Hebrew I covers basic vocabulary and syntax, and the morphology of the regular verb. Hebrew II deals chiefly with the irregular verb formations and builds upon the lexical and syntactical foundation laid in Hebrew I.
Old Testament Hebrew
Taught in two parts, this course covers the essentials of biblical Hebrew. Hebrew I treats basic vocabulary and syntax, including the formation of nouns and adjectives, the construct state, and the morphology of the regular verb. Hebrew II deals chiefly with the irregular verb formations and builds upon the lexical and syntactical foundation laid in Hebrew I. Reading from the Hebrew Old Testament is introduced as time permits.
Hebrew Readings
An assigned series of texts from the Hebrew Old Testament. This course is designed to refresh and enforce skills in the ancient Hebrew language, to acquaint students with larger portions of the Old Testament text, and to give wider experience in reading the various periods and genres of Hebrew. To this end, texts are chosen from the Torah, the Former and Latter Prophets, and the Writings. Special place is given to Old Testament pericopes from the church lectionary. Prerequisite: Old Testament Hebrew I and II.
Hermeneutics
An introduction to interpretation of the Bible in the original languages. The course includes introductory textual criticism, with practice in using the textual apparatus of the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia and the Nestle-Aland Greek New Testament. The history of interpretation is surveyed, with emphasis on the hermeneutics of the biblical writers and the early church. Old Testament Christology, inspiration, and linguistics are treated during the course. Genres of both testaments are studied and sample exegesis is given. The latest hermeneutical theories are briefly evaluated. Skills are established in developing a hermeneutic that is Christ-centered, churchly, and confessional, for liturgical preaching and teaching.
The Old Testament Isagogics I
An introduction to the five books of Moses, the Former Prophets, and the Writings (except Daniel), including a basic background in Old Testament history and geography. Attention is given to the theories of higher criticism, especially Pentateuchal criticism, vis-a-vis the biblical texts. The purpose, themes, and theology of these Old Testament books are dealt with.
The Old Testament Isagogics II
Supplemental to Old Testament Isagogics I, treating the books of the Latter Prophets and Daniel. The nature and hermeneutics of inspired biblical prophecy and the integrity of the prophetic message is discussed in light of the questions raised by historical criticism. There is an emphasis on the backgrounds, themes, and theology of the prophets, with a view toward their Messianic fulfillment. Questions of biblical eschatology are explored.
The New Testament Isagogics
An introduction to the books of the New Testament against their historical and cultural background, including a survey of the development of the New Testament canon. Questions of chronology, date, and authorship are addressed with reference to higher-critical questions. Stress is laid on genres, themes, theology, Christology, sacramentology, and eschatology of the New Testament books.
Synoptic Gospel
An overview of one of the Synoptic Gospels with in-depth exegetical study of selected portions of the Greek text. Offerings include Matthew and Luke. An appreciation is cultivated for the unique emphases and themes of each Synoptic Gospel. Christology is stressed, as well as the liturgical structure and setting and use in the church. A confessional hermeneutical method grounded in churchly theology is practiced in the exegesis and interpretation of the Gospel. Prerequisite: New Testament Greek.
The Gospel of John
An overview of the fourth Gospel with in-depth exegetical study of selected portions of the Greek text. The unique features of Johannine language and presentation of Christ are appreciated. Emphasized especially is the Gospel's singular Christological and sacramental structure and teaching. A catholic and confessional hermeneutical method is cultivated in the reading and interpretation of the Gospel. Prerequisite: New Testament Greek.
New Testament Epistle
A study of a major Pauline Epistle, either Romans or Galatians, including in-depth exegetical work on selected portions of the Greek text. The theme of justification through faith is explored in all its Christological richness. Sacramental themes such as baptism into Christ are carefully traced, as well as law and gospel, Old Testament fulfillment in Christ, life in Christ, and others. The original liturgical setting and use of the Epistle is duly noted. A churchly and confessional hermeneutic is cultivated in the exegetical work. Prerequisite: New Testament Greek.
The Book of Exodus
An overview of the Book of Exodus with in-depth exegetical study of selected portions of the Hebrew text. Special attention in given to the liturgical structure of the book and its foundational importance for Israel's life and worship. The nature of God's revelation of his name Yahweh is explored in depth. Stress is placed on the book's fulfillment in Christ and the church. Prerequisite: Hebrew I and II.
Old Testament Prophet
A study of an Old Testament book from the Latter Prophets with in-depth exegetical work on selected portions of the Hebrew text. Offerings include Isaiah and Ezekiel. The prophetic hermeneutic covered in Old Testament Isagogics II is deepened and applied to the particular prophetic book studied. The typology, Christology, and eschatology of each prophet are particularly stressed, as well as the peculiar themes of each book (for example, the Messianic prophecies and Servant themes in Isaiah, or the visions of God and priestly view of Ezekiel). Prerequisite: Hebrew I and II.
The Book of Psalms
A thorough exegetical study of selected Hebrew psalms representing the various genres. Attention is given to the original liturgical settings and origins of the psalms as essential to their right interpretation. There is an emphasis on Messianic and ecclesiological fulfillment and application. Prerequisite: Hebrew I and II.
The Ancient Church History (up to the Council of Chalcedon)
Patristics
The Western Church History (A.D. 451-1517)
The Eastern Bysantine Church History (A.D. 451-1453)
The Reformation and the Modern History (with an emphasis on the history of the Lutheran Church)
The History of Christianity in Russia
The Lutheran Confessions
A historical and doctrinal overview of the writings foundational to the Lutheran Church, beginning with the three Ecumenical Creeds. The meaning of subscription to the Confessions is explored. The course not only surveys the various points of doctrine taught in the Confessions, but also evaluates the Confessions' claims to true catholicity. The goal is to give a basic understanding and grasp of the confessional writings. Contemporary questions confronting Lutherans, such as church and ministry, the sacraments, and ecumenical relations are examined in light of the Book of Concord.
Dogmatics I
A thorough overview of matters pertaining to the First Article of the Creed, especially the doctrine of God and his creation. Emphasis is given to the teaching on the Holy Trinity found in the Scriptures, the church fathers, and the ecumenical councils, as well as the inseparable connection of the locus on creation to christology and ecclesiology. Also covered in the course are angelology and divine revelation.
Dogmatics II
A study of the person and work of Jesus Christ as confessed in the Second Article of the Creed. The testimony of the Scriptures, the early church and ecumenical councils, and the Lutheran Confessions is set forth over against the many Christological errors, ancient and modern. Emphasis is given to the importance of christology for such points of doctrine as justification, man, ecclesiology, and sacramentology. In connection with christology, the course treats the locus on Scripture, showing how Christ is central to biblical revelation, the Author, Subject, and Goal of the written Word of God..
Dogmatics III
An in-depth look at the loci on anthropology, original sin, grace, justification, sanctification, and law and gospel. These topics are not treated in abstraction, but in their relation to God and creation, Christology, Scripture, ecclesiology, and the sacraments, as well as in their relation to one another. Scripture, church history, and the Lutheran Confessions are examined in this connection. Ancient and modern heresies and questions are discussed in this course.
Dogmatics IV
A treatment of the doctrinal themes of church and ministry, sacraments, and eschatology. These points of doctrine are studied not only individually but with a view toward their relationship to one another, as well as to the themes covered in the other sections of Dogmatics. Emphasis is placed on the teaching of the Scriptures, the testimony of the church fathers and the church through the ages, and the Lutheran Confessions. Questions of contemporary church doctrine and practice are addressed.
Religious Bodies in Russia
Liturgics
Homiletics
Parish Catechesis and Evangelism
The Lutheran Hymnology
Christian Ethics
Pastoral Theology
Theological English


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